Gaelic, Uncategorized

My top 15 Scottish Gaelic songs (Updated)

Ar cànain ‘s ár ceol!

I have made a list of my favourite top 15 Scottish Gaelic songs below. I hope you enjoy them, if you have any favourites or any suggestions then please feel free to leave a comment at the bottom. Mòran taing.

*The first article i wrote with regards to my favourite Scottish Gaelic songs seems to have had some issues with the links i shared. I think the majority of songs have been removed from youtube which isn’t ideal so i thought i would write another updated one with up to date links hence this post.*

 

TOP 15:

 

15. Sios Dhan An Abhainn

14. Roinn An Fhearainn

13. Gaol ise Gaol i

12. Gràdh Geal Mo Chridhe

11. Fear a Bhàta

10. Griogal Cridhe

9. Fagail Bhearnaraigh

8. An Eala Bhán

7. A Ghaoil, Leig Dhachaigh Gum Mhathair Mi

6. Chi Mi’n Geamhradh

5. An Aitearachd Ard by Ishbel MacAskill

4. Dh’èirich mi moch madainn cheòthar

3. Canan nan Gaidheal

2. Òran Fir Heisgeir (Gura Mis’ Tha Fo Mhìghean)

1. Tàladh Chriosda

 

Cùm gàidhlig beò!

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Places to visit Scotland, Travel, Uncategorized

The Devil’s Pulpit

Finnich Glen, otherwise known as The devil’s Pulpit is a magical wee place in Stirlingshire, Scotland. Located somewhere between Drymen (Druiminn) and Kilearn (Cill Earnain) it is home to some pretty spectacular views, it’s also an area that is drenched in folklore and legends.

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The name relates to a rock located there that is shaped like a pulpit that you would find in a Church, though this Pulpit is surrounded by 100 ft walls and bloodied waters instead of benches or seats. Legend has it that Satan supposedly preached here, others have it as an an ancient meeting place for the Druids (Members of the high ranking professional class in the Ancient Celtic culture).

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The water is of course not blood, the water isn’t even red it’s just the effect that the red sandstone below it gives off. Regardless of why the water looks red, it does, and it’s honestly awesome!

If you do not know where you’re going it is an absolute nightmare to find, i say this because it took me two separate attempts to find it. The first time i went, there was very little information available regarding it which ultimately led to us heading the opposite direction and spending a full day searching with no luck. After it featured in Outlander a while back it’s popularity seems to have increased and there now seems to be numerous articles with information about it’s where abouts available online.

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If you plan on going be sure to make sure you have suitable clothing and shoes as getting there can be a bit dangerous or tricky. The stairs leading down (also known as the devil’s steps) were built in the 1860’s and are very narrow and slippy so please watch your footing. sometimes you may find a rope at the side of the stairs to guide you but not always, so again please be careful if you’re going down them.

Where to Park?

There is a carpark located at the end of the B834 just before the A809 road. It’s not the biggest of carparks but getting parked there shouldn’t be an issue.

How to get to the Devil’s Pulpit from the carpark

At the car park you’re wanting to take a left hand turn down the A809 and just keep following the road down. You will eventually come across a small opening to the left which will have a sign for it on the other side. Once you get through the opening, keep following the path. It’s a couple of minutes walk but the stairs should end up on your left, it’s a small entrance to the stairs so make sure you keep an eye out for them. Below is a step by step guide.

 

The Devil’s Pulpit is a great wee day out, fun and challenging it’s a place that will no doubt stay in your mind for the rest of your days. If you do visit please be careful, the footing on the stairs, the 70 foot drop surrounding it and swimming in the water can be very dangerous. It’s also a place you may struggle for a phone signal so please be careful. As always though, happy travels!

 

Cùm gàidhlig beò!